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Observers saw 92 different images of everyday objects while their brain activity was measured with fMRI and MEG. Each image was shown for 500 msec.
Combining fMRI and MEG data with representational similarity analysis, we showed which part of the brain is active shortly after an image appeared. At ~60ms, only early visual cortex in the back of the brain was active, a brain region known for early visual analysis. Then, activity spread to brain regions involved in later visual processing until the inferior temporal cortex was activated, a brain region that represents complex shapes and categories of objects.
Figure courtesy of the researchers.Observers saw 92 different images of everyday objects while their brain activity was measured with fMRI and MEG. Each image was shown for 500 msec. Combining fMRI and MEG data with representational similarity analysis, we showed which part of the brain is active shortly after an image appeared. At ~60ms, only early visual cortex in the back of the brain was active, a brain region known for early visual analysis. Then, activity spread to brain regions involved in later visual processing until the inferior temporal cortex was activated, a brain region that represents complex shapes and categories of objects. Figure courtesy of the researchers.Share This Print This