Community Resources

The McGovern Institute operates the following core facilities and programs for the MIT brain research community.

 

MINT


The McGovern Institute Neurotechnology (MINT) program aims to develop new technologies for brain research.

With support from the institute’s founders, the MINT program provides seed funding for collaborative projects that are developing new tools and technology platforms for neuroscience research.

MINT awards are typically made for a one-year period, and in some cases can cover up to $100,000 in direct costs. Funding can be extended for a second year, although this is not guaranteed. Projects involve collaboration between a McGovern Investigator (including associate investigators) and researchers from outside of the McGovern Institute. Priority is given to collaborations with other departments and disciplines within MIT, although we can also consider proposals that involve external collaborators.

For more information:

Sabbi Lall
Director of Scientific Planning
slall@mit.edu

OpenMind


The OpenMind Computing Cluster is a shared resource for the MIT brain research community.

The OpenMind computing cluster is operated by the McGovern Institute and provides the MIT brain research community with access to state-of-art computing resources. The cluster is housed at the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC) in Holyoke, MA, with a 10G link to the MIT campus. OpenMind is a Linux-based cluster with both CPU and GPU nodes, plus 2.5 PiB of storage. It supports over 200 users and 20 groups. This is a shared computer cluster across laboratories and has a yearly subscription fee, which entitles each group priority access to resources.

Prospective users should begin by registering for a user account (MIT certificate required). Specifications can be found on this wiki (MIT certificate required).

For more information:

Shaohao Chen
Computational Support Specialist
shaohao@mit.edu

Viral Core


The Viral Core, or Genetic Neuroengineering Group, engineers genetic techniques for neuroscience and neurology.

The Genetic Neuroengineering Group engineers genetic techniques for neuroscience and neurology, to allow increased understanding of the organization of the brain and improved treatments for neurological disorders.

For more information:

Ian Wickersham
Principal Research Scientist
wickersham@mit.edu